Daita Project / Ryuichi Sasaki + Sasaki Architecture

first_imgArchDaily Architects: Ryuichi Sasaki / Sasaki Architecture Area Area of this architecture project Apartments Projects Lead Architect: Ryuichi Sasaki / Sasaki Architecture Year:  Daita Project / Ryuichi Sasaki + Sasaki ArchitectureSave this projectSaveDaita Project / Ryuichi Sasaki + Sasaki ArchitectureSave this picture!© Takumi Ota+ 25Curated by Hana Abdel Share Structure: CopyApartments•Setagaya-ku, Japan Japan Save this picture!© Takumi OtaRecommended ProductsBulbs / Spots / Wall LightsiGuzziniLight Effects – TrickGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing in Art & SignageWindowsSky-FrameRetractable Insect Screen – Sky-Frame FlyWindowsLibartVertical Retracting Doors & WindowsDaita Project is a residential complex consisting of 16 apartments located in a quiet residential area close to a main road in Setagaya-ku in the Western part of Tokyo. The site is located in a hilly area dotted with L-shaped mansions surrounded by trees. Save this picture!© Takumi OtaSave this picture!Lower First FloorSave this picture!© Takumi OtaAn L-shaped space was created resembling the nearby mansions. Plantings are used at the building’s exterior reflecting the nearby natural green spaces. Three maisonette units face the street and step in relation to the natural slope of the property. The upper floors use the height difference provided by this slope to create a diverse sectional profile. The dwelling units span the depth of the site and access the surrounding scenery which resembles the natural landscape surrounding the nearby mansions. This access to nature is felt and experienced by utilizing the different heights of the dwelling units.Save this picture!© Takumi OtaL-shaped colored stainless steel openings are scattered along the facade penetrating the outer and inner wall surfaces creating a feeling reminiscent of the surrounding green area and references the existing trees nearby. Studios are arranged above the maisonettes and their ceiling heights gradually change along the sloping street while the roof follows in kind. This provides a diverse collection of spaces within the cross-sectional volume of the building.  Save this picture!© Takumi OtaSave this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Takumi OtaThe dwelling units combine a simple design with little wasted space which allows for a variety of flexible configurations. This is expressed by the contrasting white paneled and bare concrete walls. A series of steps within each of the spaces creates a relationship where living, dining and bedrooms can be changed by the residents. In addition, an L-shaped self-supporting wall has been designed to be used as a walk-in closet or perhaps as a compact PC booth. Save this picture!ElevationA playful use of materials and spaces based on a minimalism related to the nature of the site provides a richness to this special experience. A lifestyle not dominated by things and a liberating sense of freedom exists within the space. A dialogue between the existing architecture and surrounding area is firmly established through the use of color, green plantings and the physical form of the residence.Save this picture!© Takumi OtaProject gallerySee allShow lessKrushi Bhawan / Studio LotusSelected ProjectsROOM 403 / KIRI ArchitectsSelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, JapanLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/941781/daita-project-ryuichi-sasaki-plus-sasaki-architecture Clipboard Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/941781/daita-project-ryuichi-sasaki-plus-sasaki-architecture Clipboard Photographs:  Takumi Ota NI Kensetsu 2019 Area:  536 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” Contractor: Daita Project / Ryuichi Sasaki + Sasaki Architecture Atelier La Cle, Kazuki Takano “COPY” CopyAbout this officeRyuichi Sasaki / Sasaki ArchitectureOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsSetagaya-kuOn FacebookJapanPublished on June 17, 2020Cite: “Daita Project / Ryuichi Sasaki + Sasaki Architecture” 16 Jun 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodHow to Design a Façade with AluProfile Vertical ProfilesGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Silestone® Nebula SeriesWall / Ceiling LightsLouis PoulsenLamp – LP RiplsWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagRoom Dividers – Partition Wall MDFStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Mar del PlataWindowspanoramah!®ah! SecurityPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsMIS Facade PanelCarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Orbital® 07 COLORpunkt®LightsNorka lightingLuminaire – BelfastMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Daita东京集合公寓 / Ryuichi Sasaki + Sasaki Architecture是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Community Health IMPACT Awards

Closing date for applications is 15 September. Application packs are available by sending an A4 self-addressed envelope (no stamp needed) to: SB IMPACT Awards, Grants Department – The King’s Fund, 11-13 Cavendish Square, London W1M 0AN. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Community Health IMPACT Awards SmithKline Beecham’s Community Health IMPACT Awards are now open for applications. In partnership with the King’s Fund, there are 10 IMPACT Awards each of £25,000 which will be given to registered charities with a proven track record in health. The Awards are designed to recognise excellence and success in existing work.SmithKline Beecham’s Community Health IMPACT Awards are now open for applications. In partnership with the King’s Fund, there are 10 IMPACT Awards each of £25,000 which will be given to registered charities with a proven track record in health. The Awards are designed to recognise excellence and success in existing work.They are only open to organisations with an annual budget under £500,000 and, unusually, can be used for core funding. Advertisement Howard Lake | 28 June 2000 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  31 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

Safety Phone App For Outdoor Workers

first_imgThere is a tool to help employees and employers understand heat situations and risk levels. A Smartphone app is now available for outdoor workers to calculate the heat index for their work site and displays risk level based on the heat index.The free app is offered by the US Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).It is available for both Android and iPhones and can be accessed in both English and Spanish.The tool provides reminders about measures that should be taken at each risk level to protect workers. These reminders include: Drinking enough fluidsScheduling rest breaksPlanning for and knowing what to do in an emergencyAdjusting work operationsGradually building up to the workload for new workersTraining on heat illness signs and symptomsMonitoring each other for signs and symptomsDownload the app here: www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.htmlIn 2011, 61 workers died nationally from heat-related injuries and illnesses. The same year, Indiana workers experienced 100 cases of non-fatal injuries and illnesses related to heat exposure.last_img read more