TAB’s Natalie Cressman Brings Members of Snarky Puppy, Santana, & More To Brooklyn Comes Alive 2016 [Audio]

first_imgThe second annual Brooklyn Comes Alive was a dreamy success, bringing together dozens of musicians to play in once-in-a-lifetime rotations. Taking over three venues in the heart of Williamsburg, the day-long event will surely go down in the books as one of the more unique of its kind. Of the many highlights was the super group that Natalie Cressman (Trey Anastasio Band) put together for an evening set at the Brooklyn Bowl.Playing music from all over the world, the trombonist/composer/vocalist brought together drummer Nikki Glaspie (The Nth Power),  guitarist Will Bernard (Stanton Moore Trio), tenor saxophonist/flutist Chris Bullock (Snarky Puppy), bassist Benny Rietveld (Santana), keyboardist Samora Pinderhughs (Emily King, Branford Marsalis), and percussionist Danny Sadownick. To add to the surprises, Louis Cato (The Late Show with Stephen Colbert) and Elise Testone also joined in to contribute their luminary talents.Enjoy Natalie Cressman’s 2016 set below, which features covers of Peter Apfelbaum, Herbie Hancock, Gladys Knight & The Pips, and so much more.Natalie Cressman & Friends | Brooklyn Comes Alive | 10/22/16:Natalie Cressman is on the 2017 Brooklyn Comes Alive lineup. As the festival continues to roll out their band configurations, we will soon learn what Natalie “Chainsaw” Cressman has in store.The 2017 Brooklyn Comes Alive lineup features members of Umphrey’s McGee, moe., The Disco Biscuits, The String Cheese Incident, Trey Anastasio Band, and so many more. Iconic legends, such as John Scofield, George Porter Jr., Cyril Neville, DJ Premier, Johnny Vidacovich, and Henry Butler, will join members of nationally touring bands, such as GRAMMY-winners Snarky Puppy, The Meters, Primus, Soulive, Lettuce, The Motet, Lotus, Railroad Earth, The Infamous Stringdusters,Yonder Mountain String Band, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, Pendulum, Destroid, The Crystal Method, Midnight North, Aqueous, Kung Fu, Electric Beethoven, and more.***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***[Recorded, edited, mixed and mastered by Eric McRoberts]last_img read more

János Kornai Leontief Medal for economics contributions

first_imgJános Kornai, Allie S. Freed Professor of Economics Emeritus in the Department of Economics, was awarded the Leontief Medal, given annually to several Russian economists and one international economist for contributions to the field of economics.Kornai traveled to St. Petersburg, Russia, to receive the Leontief Medal, named after Nobel laureate Wassily Leontief, the creator of input-output analysis. At the Feb. 13 ceremony, Kornai was praised for his book “Economics of Shortage” (1980), which “opened the eyes of Russian economists.”last_img

Marshall to receive Radcliffe Medal

first_imgOn Radcliffe Day, May 25, hundreds of alumnae, fellows, and friends, including many University leaders, faculty, and staff, celebrate excellence and innovation — hallmarks of both Radcliffe College and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.The day will begin with a morning panel discussion and conclude with a luncheon in Radcliffe Yard featuring a formal address delivered by the Radcliffe Medalist. The Radcliffe Institute Medal is presented to an individual whose life and work have substantially and positively influenced society.This year, the Radcliffe Institute medal recipient and luncheon speaker is Margaret H. Marshall, Ed.M.’69, who has been a force for justice and equality throughout her life, beginning with her early years in South Africa and continuing through her service as the 24th chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Her decisions — including the historic case of Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which legalized gay marriage in Massachusetts — illustrate the power of law to improve society, further equality, and affect legal policy beyond a local jurisdiction.“We look forward to honoring Margaret Marshall as a true pioneer in her field — as the first woman to serve as Massachusetts chief justice and as the first justice in the country to make the landmark decision to legalize gay marriage,” said Radcliffe Dean Lizabeth Cohen, the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies. “She has dedicated her life to advancing social justice and to using the law to improve the lives of citizens.”Today, as senior counsel at Choate Hall & Stewart LLP and senior research fellow and lecturer at Harvard Law School, Marshall continues to set an example for how the law can make a difference in the lives of individuals, organizations, and society more broadly.The morning panel, “From Front Lines to High Courts: The Law and Social Change,” explores the possibilities and limits of the law in making social change. The panel will be moderated by Harvard Law School Dean and Jeremiah Smith Jr. Professor of Law Martha L. Minow, Ed.M. ’76, who is an expert in human rights with a focus on members of racial and religious minorities, and women, children, and persons with disabilities.The panel discussion she moderates will feature four prominent women who, as legal scholars and committed practitioners, will grapple with what the law can and cannot achieve in effecting social change:As a scholar and activist of labor and immigration law, practice, and reform, Jennifer Gordon ’87, J.D. ’92, is dedicated to changing how the law and our society recognize vulnerable workers. She is a professor of law at Fordham University School of Law, where she focuses on immigration law, labor law, public interest law, and law and the economy.Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Linda Greenhouse ’68 was a longtime Supreme Court reporter for The New York Times whose work and writing draw on legal history to explore questions of law and inequality. She is a senior research scholar in law, Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law, and Knight Distinguished Journalist-in-Residence at Yale Law School. She continues to write a biweekly column on law for The New York Times.As a professor of law at Suffolk University Law School, Renée M. Landers ’77 focuses on health law, constitutional law, and administrative law. Landers was the first woman of color and the first law professor to serve as president of the Boston Bar Association. She has championed social justice with a focus on civil rights and equal access to education. Landers is also a member of the Radcliffe Institute’s Dean’s Advisory Council.Panelist Kathleen M. Sullivan, J.D. ’81 — a Partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP and Stanley Morrison Professor of Law and former dean at Stanford Law School — will examine the constitutionality of same-sex marriage through the lens of a constitutional scholar and experienced litigator. She was the first woman dean of any school at Stanford and is the author of the nation’s leading casebook in constitutional law.Last year, on Radcliffe Day, Cohen was introduced to the Radcliffe community as the interim dean. Having recently been named dean by Harvard University President Drew Faust (herself a former dean of the Radcliffe Institute) Cohen will lead her first Radcliffe Day with Faust, alumnae, fellows, University colleagues, and friends of the Radcliffe Institute in attendance.“During Radcliffe Day we pause in the present to celebrate Radcliffe’s illustrious past and to pay tribute to an individual who has helped to build a better future,” said Cohen.last_img read more

Jason Alexander, front and center

first_imgActor Jason Alexander is best known for playing the neurotic George Costanza on the long-running television comedy “Seinfeld,” a series that reveled in the concept that it really was about nothing.On Thursday afternoon, Alexander visited Harvard, where he talked about something — in fact, many things.“What a handsome couple!” he declared, gesturing grandly to a portrait of Thomas and Virginia Cabot as he strolled into the Cabot House living room for a cozy conversation with about 60 students and moderator Alicia Anstead.During the candid chat, Alexander reminisced about growing up in New Jersey. “Painfully shy and a bit dysfunctional” as a child, he said magic was a way for him to interact with others (magician Mark Wilson had a tremendous influence on him when he was 6 years old). But when he got older he was advised not to pursue the craft — his small hands are not good for palm tricks, and his aversion to danger isn’t good for escape tricks — and at about the same time, when he was 13, a girl asked him if he could sing. To impress her, he said he could, and found himself playing a Von Trapp child in a local production of “The Sound of Music.”He never looked back.Alexander has had a diverse and successful career, from winning a Tony Award for “Jerome Robbins’ Broadway” to writing the book “Dad, Are You the Tooth Fairy?” In addition to comic acting, he’s been a singer, dancer, director, children’s book author, magician (still), champion poker player, and a father of two. He’s even helped a director rewrite cue cards for a beer commercial so the ad’s star, Yankee catching legend Yogi Berra, could understand them.Anstead at one point rattled off a long list of his creative endeavors until Alexander stopped her. “I’m in a video game?” he asked, sincerely surprised. “What one?”“Kingdom Hearts 3-D,” Anstead replied, after checking her notes.“Oh yeah …,” Alexander smiled. “I was in that.“It’s all part of the same thing,” he continued. “It’s all creative. Poker is an acting job.”The formula to become a doctor or a lawyer is clear, Anstead said, but what’s the prescription for a career in the arts?“No one can prevent you from being an artist,” Alexander declared. The most any artist can do, he said, is give people more to see through their eyes — and that kind of interaction is imperative for humanity to thrive.Alexander told about a time a group of U.S. Marines approached him in a restaurant. They saluted him, and their leader explained that they had just left Iraq and were bound for Afghanistan. In the darkness in Iraq, one of them said, the platoon would spend hours after an ugly day watching “Seinfeld” DVDs, and that helped to restore their humanity. That’s what art is about, Alexander said.Later, during a question-and-answer session, a student asked Alexander to name his favorite “Seinfeld” episode. No favorite, he said with a grin, but the three episodes that had the greatest impact on him were “The Chinese Restaurant,” “The Parking Garage,” and “The Contest.”Asked what he’d like to do that he hasn’t yet, Alexander expressed a deep, passionate desire to act and sing in the dark musical “Sweeney Todd,” and offered a blood-stirring analysis of the character.After his talk, Alexander turned the stage over to the Veritones, and joined the audience to enjoy their performance.The session was part of the Learning From Performers program of the Office for the Arts at Harvard, and was supported by the Bernard H. and Mildred Kayden Visiting Artist Fund.last_img read more

College to host ‘Encounter Retreat’

first_imgThis weekend, 18 Saint Mary’s students will participate in the fourth annual student-run Encounter Retreat. The event, sponsored by Campus Ministries, will be held at Camp Friedenswald in Michigan from Friday afternoon until Saturday evening. The Encounter Retreat is a once-a-year event for Saint Mary’s that focuses on students developing personal relationships with Christ. Students also learn to think about the ways they encounter Christ in their lives. The retreat involves a series of six different talks concerning different aspects of faith and relationships. Student leaders deliver all of the talks. “Students enjoy getting to know God through other people,” Campus Ministry Assistant Director Regina Wilson said. The student speeches differentiate the Encounter Retreat from other retreats. Every year, student leaders put a lot of thought and effort into their speeches. Students often apply creative techniques in their lessons including the use of music to establish and support a message. The weekend will begin with a talk on how the attendees might first come to understand themselves and will conclude on Saturday with a talk titled “Beyond the Encounter,” at which time attendees will be invited to learn how to be Christ-like to others. Throughout the weekend, attendees will also be encouraged to share personal stories of how Christ has impacted their lives. The retreat will end with a Mass at the retreat center. In the past, students have found the retreat rewarding, giving positive feedback, and Wilson said she is confident this year’s retreat will prove to have similar results. “Students come looking for something such as friendship or faith and often find it very gratifying,” Wilson said. “The goal of the retreat is that students will learn that their encounters with Christ have consequences.” The retreat also promises community-bonding events including games and various other activities. Wilson said she hopes the weekend will bring all in attendance closer not only with Christ, but also with each other.last_img read more

Blueberry Fungus

first_imgBlueberries are one of the most popular backyard fruits for Georgia because they are relatively low maintenance compared to other fruit species. However, there is one particular disease issue known as “mummy berry” that can be problematic for blueberry growers.The disease is easily recognized when the fruit begins to ripen, as infected berries become dry, shrivel and drop prematurely. These infected berries are a pinkish color rather than the normal blue. This is caused by a fungus that can survive over the winter inside the fruit mummies that lay on the ground. Spores within infected berries can remain viable for several years.Mummy berry can cause crop yield losses as high as 25% to 50% are not unusual if left untreated. Blueberry varieties differ in their susceptibility to the disease. Unfortunately, some of the most popular varieties for Georgia are known to be highly susceptible.  This year has been a terrible year for mummy berry disease due to the unusually cool, wet spring weather. Late freezes also predisposed leaves and flower buds to infection.Mummy berry actually infects blueberry plants in two stages. The first stage occurs when spores (ascospores) are released from the fruit mummies on the ground. Wind spreads the spores to nearby plants, infecting newly emerging shoots and leaves. Newly infected leaves, buds, stems and flower clusters suddenly wilt, turn brown and eventually become covered in a powdery mass of spores. Secondary spores (conidia) from these blighted shoots are then carried to open flowers along with pollen. In fact, bees and other pollinators inadvertently spread the spores during pollination. During the second stage, the spores infect developing berries by growing into and colonizing the ovaries of the fruit.Unfortunately, by the time most people notice the problem — normally close to harvest — it’s too late to do anything to salvage your blueberries for the current season. This is true of most plant disease issues. Once you’ve seen this disease in your blueberry planting, you can anticipate it will return the following year. The good news is that there are effective fungicide options that can be sprayed to prevent this disease early in the growing season. A few properly timed fungicide applications can effectively control this disease.   Sanitation is an important tactic for managing mummy berry disease with backyard blueberry growers, since fungicide options for home gardeners are limited. Burying or mulching the mummies during the winter can help prevent future infections. Rake or use a leaf blower to move mummies into row centers and bury 2 inches deep by disking the soil between rows or adding 2 inches of mulch. A bagging mower could be used to collect and remove the mummies. Shallow cultivation between rows before bud break can also kill any exposed fungal fruiting bodies. It is difficult to ensure that all mummies will be buried or removed, so chemical control is also necessary.  Fungicides should be applied soon after bud break when green tip occurs on leaf buds or less than 5% open bloom occurs on the flowers, whichever comes first. Continue sprays until all blooms have fallen. Once the flowers have been pollinated, no further infection can take place.One control option that provides fair control is a product containing the natural bacterium Bacillus subtilis, sold under the brand name Serenade. This has been shown to reduce mummy berry infection if applied at the shortest labeled intervals during bloom.  Another good fungicide option is Captan 50WP applied every 7 to 10 days through bloom. Be sure to get a standalone fungicide that is not combined with any insecticides. Insecticides should never be applied during bloom as they will harm bees that are necessary for pollination.For more information about growing blueberries, check out University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Circular 946, “Home Garden Blueberries,” at extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

Criminal Procedure Rules amendments

first_img May 1, 2005 Regular News Criminal Procedure Rules amendments At the request of the Florida Bar’s Criminal Procedure Rules Committee, the Florida Supreme Court has adopted amendments to the Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure. Specifically, the court amended Rule 3.111 (Providing Counsel to Indigents), Rule 3.220(o) (Discovery; Costs of Indigents), and Rule 3.670 (Rendition of Judgment) and adopted new rule 3.984 (Affidavit of Indigent Status). See In re: Amendments to the Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure – Conform Rules to 2004 Legislation, SC04-2489 (Fla. April 7, 2005). The court invites all interested persons to comment on the amendments, which are summarized below and can be found online in the court’s opinion at www.floridasupremecourt.org/decisions/2005/sc04-2489.pdf. An original and nine paper copies of all comments must be filed with the court on or before June 6, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on the committee chair, Judge Thomas H. Bateman III, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 365-C, Tallahassee 32301-1861. The committee chair has until June 30 to file a response to any comments filed with the court. Electronic copies of all comments and the chair’s response must be filed in accordance with the Court’s Administrative Order In Re: Mandatory Submission of Electronic Copies of Documents, Fla. Admin. Order No. AOSC04-84 (Sept. 13, 2004). Label envelope to avoid erasure. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA IN RE: AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA RULES OF CRIMINAL PROCEDURE – CONFORM RULES TO 2004 LEGISLATION, CASE NO. SC04-2489. Summary of Amendments: Rule 3.111(b)(5)(C): Requires the accused to execute an affidavit of insolvency as required by section 27.52, Florida Statutes. Conforms rule to new language in section 27.52, Florida Statutes, which provides that the circuit court clerks shall use “a form developed by the Supreme Court” to determine indigency. See ch. 204-265, § 9, at 959, Laws of Fla. Rule 3.984: Added to codify the affidavit of indigent status form approved by the Court for use by the clerks of the circuit courts in I n re Approval of Form for Use by Clerks of the Circuit Courts Pursuant to Rule 10-2.1(a) of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, 877 So. 2d 720 (Fla. 2004). Rule 3.220(o): Provides that after a defendant is adjudged insolvent, the reasonable costs incurred in the operation of the rules shall be taxed as costs against the state. Conforms rule to the 1998 Revision No. 7 to Article V of the Florida Constitution. Rule 3.670: Provides that where allowed by law, the judge may withhold an adjudication of guilt if the judge places the defendant on probation. Conforms rule to section 775.08435, Florida Statutes (2004), which prohibits the withholding of adjudication of guilt in felony cases in certain circumstances. See ch. 2004-60, § 1, at 443, Laws of Fla. Criminal Procedure Rules amendmentslast_img read more

Hinterland estate expected to attract international buyers

first_imgAnd one of four bedrooms. The architecture is “chic wine country style”.“Sarabah Estate Vineyard is owned by a prominent private Brisbane family who have improved the property in every aspect and have thoroughly enjoyed the experience,” said marketing agent Michael Vettoretto of Sotheby’s International Realty, who is selling the property on behalf of owners Cameron and Toni-Maree Bishop. “They have loved growing their own grapes and having their wine bottled, exploring the branding options of an established vineyard name and developing all other aspects of the property for their personal enjoyment. Even their friends and family have participated in the annual traditional vine pruning festivities.” The kitchen features marble and stainless steel. The wrought iron staircase.Past a larger-than-life chess set resplendent at the entry way, inside the grand entrance lobby a chandelier enhances an undulating staircase with wrought iron balustrades. Further exploration of the house reveals a rooftop terrace, a basement wine cellar, generous bedrooms and a master suite with a sitting area and fireplace, one of five in the house. The valley surrounds are captured through multiple vantage points inside the home, while concertina doors open to whimsical garden settings and sun-filled patios. 46 Rymera Rd, Sarabah is on the market via an expressions of interest campaign.TOWERING white pillars, creamy tones, elaborate decor and a strikingly regal facade. The mansion looks as though it’s been plucked from a European countryside, to rest in the Sarabah Valley, in the Scenic Rim.Like a fine wine, the residence has deepened its characteristics, pairing with the picturesque valley to produce an exclusive estate. There are multiple patios.“The property could be remodelled as a boutique hotel with room to develop additional accommodation on site, subject to council approval,” Mr Vettoretto said. “It’s the perfect home for entertaining all year round with endless options, formal and informal, indoors or outdoors.”The property is on the market through an expressions of interest campaign and Mr Vettoretto expects attention from both domestic and international buyers. Most living spaces overlook the tranquil valley. One of six bathrooms. The property features a large pool.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa19 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoPillars lend grandeur to the home.As well as the vineyard, olive groves and main residence, the property encompasses a cellar door bistro, wedding function centre, marquee, a working market garden and citrus grove. At the heart of it all, yet tucked away at the end of a long driveway lies the manor, currently used as a private residence.last_img read more

London’s Gherkin tower up for sale in wake of IVG receivership

first_imgIVG’s tranche of the loan is in Swiss francs, which had appreciated against sterling by more than 60%.IVG had a 50% stake in the 30 St Mary Axe property, held in the Euroselect 14 fund, with Evans Randall as equal partner. The joint venture paid £630m in 2007 for the building, using £400m of debt.Designed by Lord Foster, the 40-storey skyscraper is currently multi-let to around 20 tenants including Swiss Re and ION Trading.Jamie Olley, Deloitte Real Estate head of city investment, said the property provided an “attractive combination of stable and reversionary income”, with opportunities to add value via asset management.Olley said: “The property will appeal to a wide range of domestic and international investors, and we are confident of maximising returns to the receivers and creditors.”Earlier this month, IVG Immobilien had its insolvency plan approved by a German court, clearing the way for a €2.2bn debt reduction programme.The plan includes a debt for equity swap – taking IVG off the stock market.IVG said the Bonn Regional Court’s rejection of complaints against the plan by investors allowed it to proceed with restructuring.Under the plan, IVG Immobilien and its current subsidiaries, IVG Institutional Funds and IVG Caverns, will run as separate and independently operating companies. IVG Immobilien will operate solely in real estate, while its Institutional Funds arm will focus on business with real estate funds for institutional investors.Insolvency proceedings – which have lasted almost a year – will close by the end of this quarter. IVG Immobilien’s Gherkin tower in London has been put up for sale three months after being put into receivership with Deloitte.Savills and Deloitte Real Estate, both companies confirmed, are marketing the 505,000 sqft office tower.Media reports suggest the asset could be sold for as much as £650m (€819m).IVG Immobilien called in receivers in April this year as part of the German firm’s restructuring plan, with its loan-to-value ratio having risen above 90% and well above its 67% LTV covenant.last_img read more

Brunel eyes £1.3bn emerging markets equities allocation

first_imgA consortium of UK local authority schemes has announced plans for a £1.3bn (€1.5bn) emerging markets fund.The Brunel Pension Partnership said in a statement that it would launch a formal tender process in January, but invited managers to be involved “right from the outset”.Mark Mansley, Brunel’s CIO, said: “Emerging markets will be the source of over half of global economic growth over the next 10 years. Emerging markets are also home to a growing number of world class companies as well as interesting niche business able to access particular opportunities.“Undoubtedly there’s great potential here for investment managers able to think long-term and find the best opportunities. We are starting the process of identifying the best of these today.” Mark Mansley, chief investment officer, BrunelThe emerging markets fund will be the third on Brunel’s platform when it opens next year, following the launch of a £1bn smart beta fund earlier this month. It has also made commitments to long-lease property funds run by M&G and Aberdeen Standard Investments.Legal & General Investment Management runs Brunel’s passive mandates as well as the smart beta fund. Consultancy groups Inalytics and Redington will assist Brunel with the manager search and assessment.Brunel is a collaboration between 10 pension funds in the UK’s Local Government Pension Scheme, with combined assets of £28.9bn. The organisation has initially called for strategic research and “thought pieces” from asset managers – but not formal proposals. It has also invited interested parties to register for updates when the full tender process is launched.last_img read more