Legalising weed could see $675m a year spent on health interventions – report

first_imgOn top of that GST income, it also forecasts around $640 million from excise tax and $440 million from a specific harm reduction levy.In total, it would mean more than $1 billion a year coming in from taxes on legalised cannabis.READ MORE: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/legalised-cannabis-would-create-thousands-jobs-earn-around-1-billion-per-year-in-taxes-report “Using the suggested minimum prices of $20 for low THC products, $30 for medium THC products, and $40 for high THC products, it is likely that a total of $335 million in GST will be raised by the sale of 110 tonnes of recreational cannabis,” the report says. It recommends a limit of 110 to 120 tonnes of dried cannabis produced per annum – a significant increase on its current modelling, which estimates around 74 tonnes of cannabis is currently consumed each year in New Zealand.center_img NZ Herald 8 September 2020A legal cannabis market for recreational use could generate $675 million a year for the Government to spend on reducing cannabis-related harm, new economic modelling shows.Two reports by Business and Economic Research Ltd (Berl) also say that legalisation would see an initial spike in cannabis use, accompanied by more cannabis-related hospitalisations.But this would recede in the longer term and, with excise tax revenue put towards effective health interventions, cannabis users would have improved health outcomes while the justice system would save $11.4 million a year.Berl’s modelling was done for the Ministry of Justice in the lead-up to next month’s referendum on legalising cannabis for personal use.It was going to be published after the referendum in case it might unduly influence voters, but it has been released today following Official Information Act requests.Justice Minister Andrew Little has so far been coy about the value of any levy on legal cannabis products, which would be ring-fenced for health services such as therapy or addition treatment.But Berl estimated the level of excise tax based on the current price of cannabis and three different levels of potency of THC – the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis.It estimated the tax would net the Government $640 million per year.Adding the revenue from licensing fees minus the cost of administering the scheme, Berl says there would be $675m a year that could be used for health services.READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12363248Legalised cannabis would create thousands of jobs, earn around $1 billion per year in taxes – reportTVNZ One News 9 September 2020If cannabis is legalised after this year’s referendum, it could see up to 5000 new jobs created in the sector and bring in more than $1 billion in taxes, according to two newly released reports.The Business and Economic Research Limited (BERL) report was commissioned by the Ministry of Justice and was proactively released to media today.last_img read more

Syracuse solving struggles at plate ahead of Big East crunch time

first_img Published on April 17, 2013 at 12:37 am Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse It was as if weeks of offensive struggle had become too much to bear.After going down 5-0 in the first inning against Georgetown on Sunday, the Syracuse offense adjusted its focus and mounted a comeback that could propel it into the latter half of its Big East schedule.Nine innings and nine unanswered runs later, the Orange defeated the Hoyas 9-5 on the heels of a surprising offensive outbreak.Syracuse (14-22, 2-7 Big East) will square off with Villanova (15-20, 2-9) in a doubleheader at Skytop Softball Stadium on Wednesday. While the Orange’s pitching has struggled, its anemic offense hasn’t been able to pick up the slack. Heading into its next conference test, SU will need its offense to build on Sunday’s success and start a new chapter in what has been a disappointing season thus far.“It’s always easier when the offense is clicking,” head coach Leigh Ross said. “It’s easier to play with a lead and it helps the pitching staff get comfortable.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange has scored first in five of its nine conference games. But after striking first blood, the team’s bats have tended to shrink as games move on.But Sunday was different.After Lindsey Larkin yielded five runs to the Hoyas in the top of the first, the Orange seemed to be heading toward another defeat. Then, Corinne Ozanne pulled off a quick turnaround.“I really struggled on Saturday and I was pretty discouraged,” Ozanne said. “Sunday, they threw the same pitchers as Saturday. I just did my best to feel out the sequences and put the ball in play.”Ozanne went 0-for-5 combined in both games of a doubleheader on Saturday, then followed it up with a performance of a lifetime. On a 2-2 fastball, she jumpstarted the Orange offense with a solo home run in the top of the fourth. In the next inning, she hit a two-run home run down the left field line to make the score 5-3. After her sacrifice fly tied the game at 5-5 in the seventh, her three-run homer in the ninth put the Orange ahead for good.Her final line: three hits, three home runs, seven RBIs.Along with Ozanne, Julie Wambold and Jasmine Watson each hit two home runs on the weekend, giving the Orange a jolt of power when it needed it the most.“We work a lot on our offensive game, and for us to pull through with eight long balls on the weekend is big,” Ozanne said. “That gives our pitching staff both a cushion and some confidence.”With the absence of sophomore Lindsay Taylor, SU’s pitching staff has struggled in Big East play. Syracuse has given up an average of nine runs in the team’s nine conference games, but the offense hasn’t been much better.The Orange is averaging a little more than three runs per game. With two games against Villanova on Wednesday and a home series with Seton Hall this weekend, it’s still not too late to mitigate the season’s struggles and right the ship.“We just need to hit the ball,” Ozanne said. “That’s going to be the key moving forward. To hit the ball and let the other team make the mistakes.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more